The differences in perception of london between poets william blake and william wordsworth

There were no rules to protect these workers. Blake looks towards the present situation of grief, and his poems reflect that sentiment. Blake and Wordsworth show this death with their profound words and their sorrowful depictions of the loss of happiness in London.

Get Full Essay Get access to this section to get all help you need with your essay and educational issues. People were worked tirelessly, with no regard for their own welfare. The Romantic writers were concerned with social issues of the day. Housing was erected, but these people lived in squalor.

There is no fear or terror portrayed as Blake does. He describes the toll of the slum like on humanity, which is neither happy nor gives any hope for the future.

To be a leader in such a dangerous step forward, there were sacrifices and mistakes to be made. The poem is much darker and it is apparent when compared to the more free-spirited poem of William Wordsworth. Blake and Wordsworth were both soldiers armed with their pens in the march against the tyranny of corruption.

His writing was greatly influenced by the Elizabethans, not embracing the lyrical style of Romanticism as greatly. The two poems are both individual and told from a exclusive perspective of the two poets, however they give remarkably contradictory views of the urban city.

William Wordsworth and William Blake – Nature and Anti Nature

There is also alliteration in this stanza. Writing itself changed dramatically, though only for a short period of time: Another major concern was Industrialization, which dramatically changed the face of the world—machines were now used to manufacture in quantity.

I see in Wordsworth the natural man rising up against the spiritual man continually, and then he is no poet but a heathen philosopher: Wordsworth explains the degradation of human spirit with his metaphor of an idle cesspool, his idea of the citizens of London.

Both authors were against this transformation of the city because it destroyed all beauty and happiness, both of which they were very fond of. The new London not only lost its innocence, but it lost its happiness. More essays like this: The Romantic poets, in general, supported revolution, rejected Industrialization, and praised nature and the natural world—this was accompanied by the concern for the exploitation of women, children and the weak—and the emphasis of the individual and his unique experiences in the world.

Although the poems both convey a message of sadness for their beloved London, the authors go in two very different directions to do so. Throughout his poem, Wordsworth compliments Milton to praise the pre-Revolutionary London. Chesterton sums it up in his biography of Blake: A man of happiness who revered God.

Blake claimed to have received angelic visitations and other visionary experience even as a child. William Blake was a Romantic writer as well, but his work found a slightly different focus.

These sacrifices and mistakes led to an end of innocence for the grand city. To romantic artists of all sorts, this end of innocence was a death of culture and life. The Industrial Revolution swept England by storm, and the upper classes were reaping the benefits while the lower classes suffered.

The reader can see the cheerful innocence of the old London and picture its contrast with the industrial ravaged modern London. Wordsworth literally describes England as a swamp of still unmoving waters.

For I must tread on shadowy ground, must sink Deep — and, aloft ascending, breathe in worlds To which the heaven of heavens is but a veil. All strength — all terror, single or in bands, That ever was put forth in personal form — Jehovah — with his thunder, and the choir Of shouting Angels, and the empyreal thrones — I pass them unalarmed.

This makes the reader truly feel like a citizen of London; blind to life, confused, and scared. Wordsworth uses John Milton as a metaphor to represent the old joyful London. Wordsworth speaks of a past London, in which everything was better.

The organic environment of the countryside was frequently contrasted to the filthiness and desolation of the manmade cities, which were rapidly growing with the Industrial revolution.

Blake portrays his hatred of the situation of London by looking at the bleak modern times, while Wordsworth did so by looking to the past and how it was superior to the present.

Wordsworth and the Via Naturaliter Negativasays: As both poets are romantics you could expect the poems to be of the same variety, however this is not the case.Compare and contrast Blake and Wordsworth's view of London William Wordsworth and William Blake both wrote popular poems about London, but their views of it were very different, this could be because of the way they grew up.

Comparison between William Blake and William Wordsworth’s Views of London William Blake grew up in the slums of London and this is shown in his poem, he wrote his poem in the slums and back alleys of London as he never had very much money.

Differences between: London by Blake and London () by Wordsorth: London by William Blake I wandered through each chartered street, Near where the chartered Thames does flow.

Reading William Blake and William Wordsworth back-to-back brings to mind the similarities and differences between them. As they are contemporaries, and both are considered key figures in the Romantic movement in poetry, it’s natural to assume that they have much [ ].

A Comparison of William Blake and William Wordsworth in Romantic Poems PAGES 4. WORDS 2, View Full Essay. More essays like this: Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University. Exactly what I needed.

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Poetry – Compare Blake and Wordsworth Essay

- Comparison between William Blake and William Wordsworth’s Views of London William Blake grew up in the slums of London and this is shown in his poem, he wrote his poem in the slums and back alleys of London as he never had very much money.

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The differences in perception of london between poets william blake and william wordsworth
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